tokujin yoshioka's memory chair for moroso has unlimited forms
 
tokujin yoshioka's memory chair for moroso has unlimited forms
mar 31, 2010

tokujin yoshioka's memory chair for moroso has unlimited forms

 

  tokujin yoshioka’s memory chair for moroso has unlimited forms

 

 

 

japanese designer tokujin yoshioka has designed ‘memory’ for italian company moroso, presented at milan design week 2010.a chair of unlimited forms, it is completed through the alteration of its silhouette. for the project, yoshioka developed a special fabric made with recycled aluminum, which he has used to create a chair that transforms and memorizes its shape upon use.

tokujin yoshioka memory moroso designboom profile view of ‘memory’

 

 

 

‘based on a concept which I conceived several years ago, we spent more than one year conducting experiments and verifications by making more than 50 actual scale models with aluminum. also for the fabric, I searched the most appropriate fabric that can realize the initial concept image, and I finally came to develop a fabric with recycled aluminum. after repetition of trial and error, ‘memory’, a chair that transforms and memorizes its shape by the intention of users, was completed. ‘memory’ has ‘a deliberate loose form’.(…) I believe that the chair could be called ‘a chair without a design.’ at the same time, this is a chair that has an unlimited variety of forms.’ – tokujin yoshioka

tokujin yoshioka memory moroso designboom a process of evolution

 

tokujin yoshioka's memory chair for moroso has unlimited forms ‘memory’ chair sequence

 

tokujin yoshioka's memory chair for moroso has unlimited forms ‘memory’ chair in its beginning state

 

tokujin yoshioka's memory chair for moroso has unlimited forms transformation occurring…

tokujin yoshioka's memory chair for moroso has unlimited forms ‘memory’ chair

tokujin yoshioka's memory chair for moroso has unlimited forms tokujin yoshioka with the ‘memory’ chair

process work: tokujin yoshioka's memory chair for moroso has unlimited forms final silver prototype made from fabric of recycled aluminum

tokujin yoshioka's memory chair for moroso has unlimited forms detail tokujin yoshioka's memory chair for moroso has unlimited forms black prototype made from fabric of recycled aluminum

tokujin yoshioka's memory chair for moroso has unlimited forms detail tokujin yoshioka's memory chair for moroso has unlimited forms ‘failures’ – study models were made from aluminum

tokujin made more than 50 models in order to express the ‘deliberate loose form’ of the chair.

tokujin yoshioka's memory chair for moroso has unlimited forms ‘failures’ – study models were made from aluminum tokujin yoshioka's memory chair for moroso has unlimited forms ‘failures’ – study models were made from aluminum tokujin yoshioka's memory chair for moroso has unlimited forms potential effect of the material – this image is not of the final fabric

  • The gesture ‘why not’ the outcome ‘predictable’, I think we’re looking, alongside the designer, for something that isn’t there.

    Davet
  • I love how Tokujin has this way of taking seemingly heavy materials and applying them in such a way that makes them appear weightless.

    I actually quite like this. It definitely does not follow in the typical aesthetic of ‘memory’ furniture. Also, futuristic, but at the same time humble in its form.

    Franny
  • Looks a lot like my foil wrapped left overs in the fridge. Maybe I can sit on them too??

    rewuit
  • ‘TY’, ‘might’ I suggest leaving your mock-humble boots at home for Milan this year

    onlyjoking
  • the first image looks like a tombstone and the second reminds me of that damien hirst diamante skull thing – am I losing my mind?

    probably...
  • I dont have a problem with the design, but these kind of grandiose statements were fine before the advent of comment-able design blogs…
    I guess ‘I copied the idea from some mountain-thingys that were installed at MOT museum in Tokyo last year’ doesn’t have the same allure…
    https://www.designboom.com/weblog/cat/10/view/3657/kimihiko-okada-at-the-museum-of-contemporary-art-tokyo.html

    eternalcynic
  • I’ve seen and done several projects that follow this type of design philosophy. The designer can’t rely entirely on the novelty of the process. The outcome must me as stimulating visually as it is mentally and I think this is lacking in that area.

    i.altares

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