loading video...

yukari hotta breathes life into sculptural objects by molding small openings

Yukari Hotta presents IKIMONO for the mindcraft project 2023

 

This year’s Mindcraft Project offered both a one-day physical exhibition in Denmark and its ongoing digital exhibition, allowing visitors to experience the creations and meet the designers face-to-face. Among the featured projects, which included Marianne Eriksen Scott-Hansen and Sara Martinsen’s paper installations previously highlighted on designboom here and here, there was IKIMONO by Yukari Hotta, an exploration of sculptural objects crafted from clay and stoneware. Hotta’s pieces are shaped by her hands, influenced by the inherent properties of the clay, and are deliberately free from glaze. The unique tones and textures in her works emerge from hand-textured imprints, sanding, and variations in kiln temperatures during the firing process, appearing both familiar and enigmatic. ‘IKIMONO in Japanese translates to ‘living creature’ or ‘living being’. It’s a general term that can refer to any living organism, whether it’s an animal, a plant, or even a human being,’ Hotta told designboom, which attended the exhibition as a media partner and had discussions with the designers.

yukari hotta breathes life into sculptural objects by molding small openings
all images by Anders Sune Berg, unless stated otherwise

 

 

Nature, Human Form & Creative Intuition

 

Hotta draws her inspiration from natural elements collected from forests and coastlines, as well as from the human form. ‘My work is often based around the slow-moving wonders of nature and daily coincidences, but also the people around me. I enjoy studying old trees, stones and plants as well as the human body. The way nature grows is very fascinating to me, especially slowly over time,’ describes the designer. Her objective is to establish a personal connection between the viewer and her creations. ‘I hope people can relate to their own sense of body when they look at these works. It could be their child’s body, their partner’s, or even their own.’ As she molds each piece, she allows her intuition to guide her. The objects evolve in unexpected ways, influenced by gravity and the natural flow of creativity. She even punctuates these creations with small openings, treating each piece as a living entity. She believes these openings provide a sense of ‘breath’ to the objects, enhancing airflow. Her aim is to challenge viewers’ perceptions, noting that people often associate small openings with vases.

yukari hotta breathes life into sculptural objects by molding small openings
the designer views each piece as an individual character

 

 

Over the past decade, Hotta transitioned from a designer to a ceramic artist. The acquisition of her own kiln and a more spacious studio space three years ago allowed her to deepen her connection with clay and stoneware. Her approach to each form involves subtle variations in technique, such as sanding and firing temperatures, complemented by the inherent qualities of unglazed clay sourced from various locations. This combination results in each piece having a unique character. Her background in design informs her ability to transform tactile sensations and the beauty of natural elements into handcrafted art. Her choice to avoid glaze in favor of the raw beauty of natural clay ensures that each object bears the marks of her hands and the character of the clay itself.

Hotta’s creative process is organic, embracing the unexpected. Her initial sketches evolve as she allows the creative process to flow naturally, adapting her work as she goes. Her memories are tied to images, sensations, and movements rather than specific events, focusing on the tactile and visual experience of her pieces. ‘I focus on the movements, shapes, and the tactile sensation rather than the physical form itself.’

yukari hotta breathes life into sculptural objects by molding small openings
an exploration of the connection between nature, the human form, and the clay medium

yukari hotta breathes life into sculptural objects by molding small openings
the designer treats each piece as a living entity, creating openings to provide a sense of ‘breath’

mindcraft-project-yukari-hotta-ikimono-designboom-180000

the sculptures evolve in unexpected ways, informed by gravity and the natural flow of creativity

yukari hotta breathes life into sculptural objects by molding small openings
the pieces are influenced by the inherent properties of the clay, and are deliberately free from glaze

mindcraft-project-yukari-hotta-ikimono-designboom-31800

image by Benjamin Lund

yukari hotta breathes life into sculptural objects by molding small openings
hand-textured imprints give a unique character to the resulting artwork

yukari hotta breathes life into sculptural objects by molding small openings
portrait of Yukari Hotta in front of her exhibits, image ©designboom

 

 

1/7
image by Benjamin Lund
image by Benjamin Lund
image by Benjamin Lund
image by Benjamin Lund
image by Benjamin Lund
image by Benjamin Lund
image by Benjamin Lund
image by Benjamin Lund
image by Benjamin Lund
image by Benjamin Lund
image by Benjamin Lund
image by Benjamin Lund
image by Benjamin Lund
image by Benjamin Lund

project info:

 

name: IKIMONO

designer: Yukari Hotta | @yukarihotta

event: the Mindcraft Project 2023

KEEP UP WITH OUR DAILY AND WEEKLY NEWSLETTERS
suscribe on designboom
- see sample
- see sample
suscribe on designboom

happening now! for over 50 years, florim ceramiche spa has created porcelain stoneware ceramic surfaces for all architecture, building industry and interior design needs – discover all about the brand’s new collections on designboom! 

PRODUCT LIBRARY

a diverse digital database that acts as a valuable guide in gaining insight and information about a product directly from the manufacturer, and serves as a rich reference point in developing a project or scheme.

X
5