classic bicycles have followed a formula for the past century — two wheels, one of which is linked to pedals by a chain, has remained the basic layout, while new materials and technologies continue to evolve. the fliz concept bicycle experiments with this idea and employs a harness system that the rider can hang from, rather than sit on the frame. this makes the rider run to build up momentum before placing their feet on a set of treads located near the rear wheel.


all images © fliz

 

 

the fliz refers to the german word to whip or dashflitzenand harks back to a time before the traditional bike designs we have grown to love. it shares more in common with the hobby-horse, or laufmaschine, invented by baron karl drais in 1817. the designers started by analyzing the laufmaschine, and thinking about how its design could be refined. like the hobby-horse, this concept has no pedals and relies on the rider creating a scooting motion. this gives the occupant an opportunity to pace, while traveling faster and further than normal. they’re arched forward throughout the ride, with their hands resting on handlebars, and their head peering through the front of the glass and carbon fiber frame. it designed for people around six feet (1.85 m) tall, while the harness is bespoke-built for each user and has a quick release-system with a five-point fastener.

 

 

it should be noted that the flizs hasn’t been designed with the intention to replace the bicycle, but rather as another alternative for people looking to get around urban environments.

  • Other than showing off, like on a Hoverboard, I cannot see the reason to own one. Who wants to ‘hang’ (pressure points) from anything, other than a parachutist?

    Jim

    JimCan says:
  • Its called a scooter

    Bobo says:
  • Oh dear – we have reinvented the draisine from 200 years ago.

    Chris P says:
  • I like people that think outside the box. But don’t see how this would be as efficient or safe as a regular bike. I think someone could easily break an ankle on that design. I am very much into biking. I go out at least twice a week.

    Mark says:
  • i.ve been biking for 27 years now.been through many bikes.i.ll stay with a traditional bike or 15 speed use it.when done after it wears out.get another.at 74 i.ll stick with. Old school biking had 2 heart attacks and other problems ,but my doctor’s say keep on biking your doing fine.so why change.to a harness.i think it would put pressure on your chest and possibly squeeze the arteries in your arms.lol at 74 who gives a fliz lol

    Petey says:
  • Nevermind an ankle, looks like a neck breaker!

    Sarah says:
  • ANY injury caused by outside factors to the operator–a misstep off a curb; an unfortunate small rock; a slick surface; pedestrians and animals; other vehicles and real bicycles; you know, everything that affects the common accidents real bicycles already face–would only be worsened by the fact that the user is strapped to a harness (by the way, are different body shapes and types accommodated in this design?) with his or her HEAD IN BETWEEN A METAL GUILLOTINE. There is no forgiving tolerance to essentially bail from an accident or bail from an accident about to happen when you’re so strapped into this even contortionist’s nightmare. Also, how clever of the designers to not take any photos advocating for use of a helmet–it hardly looks like there’s been consideration to how different helmet types might fit between the clearances of the yellow guillotine. This makes me so uncomfortable it’s the first time I can say this is just poor design–not even for fun or a ho-hey! kinda project–just terribly thought-out. The form of this “bike” makes me think of a kid trying to play hop scotch through a metal jungle gym. So. Discomforting. The project’s an absolute joke, and the studio that produced it probably knows this yet still prides itself on this reveal. Next on their list of projects is probably a skateboard operated in a handstand position with wrists strapped to the boards.

    E says:
  • What’s the starting point? Or what does it apply to?

    沈忱 says:
  • oh dear, not this one again!

    peter wessell says:
  • This idea has been around for 5 years. It was a bad idea 5 years ago. It is bad now.

    RBuss says:
  • I wish this idea of hanging from the bike could be explored further maybe with pedals as putting all your weight on a seat can cause back pain and even testicular cancer.

    dom says:
  • There’s a reason nearly all the bikes used today came to be what they are. Comfortable, flexible, easy to get on and off, takes up little space, any kid can learn to use one. An awkward design even executed flawlessly with modern materials is still…kind of goofy. Meaning no offense at all to the earnest young men…hanging goofily from the frame in the picture. I’ll keep my old mass-produced Giant Yukon. But the yellow paint is nice.

    Jonathan Kratz says:
  • can anyone think about the comodity fact for the male genitalia? a big NO for me.

    Luis Alvarez says:
  • Never heard of a draisine, then looked it up – and yup it is that indeed: http://www.draisine.com/docs/deutsch/draisine/index.html – very first image – LOL!

    Al in SoCal says:

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