off-shore wind turbine lofts by morphocode
 
off-shore wind turbine lofts by morphocode
jul 16, 2013

off-shore wind turbine lofts by morphocode

off-shore ‘wind turbine lofts’ by morphocode
all images © morphocode – used with permission

 

 

the wind turbine loft concept by bulgarian interdisciplinary design studio morphocode proposes the installation of several residential units situated within the volumes of off-shore turbine nacelles. the solution aims to provide constant shelter for a group of technicians taking care of the functional integrity of the turbine. the inhabitants of the space will take care of the technical inspections, monitoring and diagnostics of the equipment, necessary to keep the turbine’s life-span as long as possible. instead of pursuing a design that references the traditional loft typology, the architectural plan embraces the exploration of un-occupied territories and living opportunities for workers.
 

 

 

off-shore wind turbine lofts by morphocode

the installation situates residential units situated within the volumes of off-shore turbine nacelles

 

 
‘as offshore wind turbines increase dramatically in size, the need for expert monitoring becomes more and more important,’ says greta and kiril of morphocode. ‘a large wind farm may consist of several hundred individual wind turbines distributed over a large body of water: endless arrays of turbine towers create a surreal grid in a lonely landscape. this odd and isolated site often remains hidden in the vastnest of the aquatic realm – seen only by the few, who are destined to serve the long lasting swing of the white giants.’

 

 

off-shore wind turbine lofts by morphocode

the configuration provides constant shelter for a group of technicians taking care of the equipment

 

 

off-shore wind turbine lofts by morphocode

the inhabitants of the space will take care of the technical inspections, monitoring and diagnostics of the equipment

 

 

off-shore wind turbine lofts by morphocode

diagram

  • It not only the sound (noise) that worries me. Have you ever been in a nacelle at 70 meters above the sea with 25 knots wind?
    I do not think the drinks will stay in your cup on the table. It moves alot up there. I is not that I am against new ideas, in the contrary. Keep on brainstorming!

    Edzo
  • Seems like a great idea but I am surprised by the comments about the noise that would drive people to drinking. Keep in mind that modern technology could use noise suppression/cancelation by use of a computer, sound system and speakers. Noise comes from the movement of air also how a speaker works. These giant generators are underutilized in many countries and by far the most efficient Green energy, if the blades are balanced properly the main problem is vibration but the housing unit may need to be relocated perhaps 20 meters underwater.

    Rob
  • Additionally, we have some pretty high-tech solutions now for soundproofing. My question is, however, Why must this be atop a windmill? Can’t it be nearer the base, perhaps floating to take account of tidal changes (oops – there might be a lot of waves). Maybe suspended or based a dozen meters above the waves. Food for thought.

    Jonathan
  • The noise of different turbines varies a lot, and depends on design. Some turbines are so quiet, that you don’t hear much when you stand next to one, and some can be annoying from a distance of several hundred meters. It’s partly a balancing act between noise, other design features and cost, partly just a question of getting the right know-how and having the incentive to use it.

    Ademeion
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